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Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
new american security. we will talk with the u.s. import export bank on president obama's trip to latin america and what it means for u.s. trade. after that, we will discuss the implementation of the health care law. ♪ host: as president obama cut his latin america trip short, and returns to washington, the washington post reports that key nato allies have tentatively agreed to take the lead role. but none have officially signed on. other news out of the middle east -- the yemen president pledging to step down when your early has not satisfied opponents. help from saudi arabia is likely to be rejected. we will keep you updated throughout today's "washington journal." the nation's health-care law turned 1 years old today. we have a separate line set aside for health care .ractitioner i the new health care law -- it says, a loose federation of left-leaning groups have gathered to peddle the virtues of health care reform. it is like we have to world. the article says that in other words, the future is very uncertain right now. i would not give more than a 50- 50 chance that all
today taking out a libyan training jet and the u.s., france and britain all taking a lead role so far. but, but, but, just two arab jets are in the region along with two of their transport planes but we do not know if they are being used and no sign of the 24 jets promised and pulled by the united arab emirates and secretary of state, hillary clinton is satisfied but author of "the coming revolution," and expert on the middle east is not satisfied. these are the folks, the arab league that said to a nation, you have to do something about libya, we are behind you when you do, and they're not. what is going on? >>guest: that is the problem, the arab league asked the united nations and asked us and the europeans to intervene yet the arab league has huge resources. we are spending $100 million, i guess, each day on this operation and there are billions of petro dollars and more important you spoke about qatar with two planes are more and you have three other amendments that are allies, why were they not asked. >>neil: they were among the nations include will bahrain, algeria, egypt, jorda
. 2011] >> the u.s. house meets today at 2:00 eastern for general speeches. legislative work starts at 4:00. members will consider bills designating dentists and vetenarian as emergency responders and disasters. tomorrow the congress will hear from the australian prime minister in a joint meeting. we'll have a live coverage of that at 11:00 eastern. on wednesday members begin kuwait on eliminating mortgage relief. transportation secretary ray lahood is on capitol hill this afternoon. he's testifying before the senate transportation committee. about his department's 2012 budget request. c-span3 will have live coverage beginning at 2:30 eastern. >> the new way to get a concise review of the day's events it's "washington today" on c-span radio. every week day we'll take you to capitol hill, the white house, and anywhere news is happening. we'll also talk with the experts, the politician mrs., and -- politicians, and the journalists. the stories that matter to you the most every week day on c-span radio. can you listen in the washington-baltimore area at 90.1 f.m. and nationwide on xm slight
force against yet another middle eastern country, this time it is oil rich libya. u.s. naval and air forces attacked libyan military installations across that country, wiping out air defenses, intelligence systems, tanks, and also apparently is now targeting that nation's ground forces. under what policy is the executive branch operating without a vote of congress and expending millions of defense dollars and state dollars on offensive action taken inside a nation that did nothing provocative toward the united states and in fact last year was even a recipient of u.s. foreign aid? the president's justification for this action was that it was not an act of war but rather humanitarian mission to prevent a catastrophe that would have result interested libya's military forces under the command of libyan president gaddafi from taking the civilian center. our president says he did not act alone. as french, british, canadian, and other western nato members participated in these attacks. the president informed congress that future operations will be handled by nato. who exactly decided all of
debated a resolution that would have removed the u.s. troops from afghanistan. the vote was 93-121. this 20 minute portion of the debate. >> i rise in strong opposition. it would undermine the everett of nation's security. insanity has been described as doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results. 3,000 people died on september 11 because we walked away once from afghanistan thinking that it didn't matter who controlled that country, we were wrong then, let us not make the same mistake twice. . as are as the undersecretary of testifies stated earlier this week, the threat emanating from the border of afghanistan and pakistan is not hypothetical. there is no other place in the world that contains such a concentration of senior al qaeda leaders and operational commanders. continue to allow these hostile organizations in this region -- to flourish in this region is to put the security of our friends and allies and the united states at great risk, end quote. to quit the area before we rooted out the terrorists would not only hand al qaeda a propaganda v
, david applegate of the u.s. geological survey will discuss the threat of earthquakes and other july 6 -- your logic hazards. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2011] host: good morning, friday, march 18. we will open up the phone lines for your comments today on the story that is most important to you. we will put the phone numbers on the screen right away. unfolding news about the u.n. security council and possible air strikes against libya, and continuing crises in japan and the budget story at home. the most significant new was story. we will go to your phone calls right away to hear what is most important to you in a week of unfolding big issues. we will go to the newspapers as we are waiting for your calls. as you can see, britain, france, and the united states are lined up for air strike against coffee -- gaddafi. it suggests in the newspapers the airplanes may well immediately. "the chicago tribune" tells us american officials expect the united states would do the heavy lifting in a campaign that may includ
. and in about 45 minutes, former u.s. comp then, political strategist maria cardona and john feehery and we will discuss the arab world with a former u.s. ambassador to morocco, marc ginsburg. on this channel, "washington journal" is next, live with your phone calls. later today, we will give you a brown paper -- roundtable that will include the mayor of boston, st. paul, the minnesota, green though, mississippi, and sacramento, california. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] host: the video on your screen is some of the latest footage on the air raids in libya, courtesy of the aljazeera network. with the president act in town, questions are being raised about u.s. policy and goals in libya. that is our discussion this morning on the "washington journal" as we go through the newspapers. what do you think? how is the president handling the libya conflict so far? 202 is the area code -- how do you think the president is handling the libyan conflict. yesterday speaker john boehner sent this letter to the president. speaker boehner list several questions he asks the question
marine in the theater has talked about the main problems, that only with u.s. direct involvement and substantial financial infusions of money -- the budget for a spans greater than the entire afghan gdp. when we leave, how will the afghan government pay for it? from his perspective, on the ground, almost entirely by u.s. supervision and u.s. financing. >> first of all, that does not give adequate credit to our afghan partners. marja, which was liberated less than a year ago, which took 4200 u.s. marines when we started, which is down now to 1600, they have been able to hold the district community council election. this is right after their great debate. it was neat stuff. this was them running this. there are 10 schools open now in marja. there were zero under the taliban. these are afghans teaching in the schools, not us. we may have to rebuild the schools, working to repair irrigation systems, the market's the use to sell exclusively illegal narcotics and weapons and explosives -- there are now about 15 markets that sell household goods, food, and clothing. these are the afghan
worse snow? germany. a big freeze in france. in the u.s., the worst blizzards of the decades. but despite all of that, but despite of all that, their economies grew in the fourth quarter. and while our growth has worsened, theirs have improved. the german economy -- the chancellor -- the chancellor should just calm down just a little bit, mr. deputy speaker. the german economy is forecast to grow more strongly than it was last year. so is the united states. growth in the world economy has been revised up. but which is the major country downgrading its growth forecast, the united kingdom. mr. deputy speaker, it's not the wrong type of snow to blame. it's the wrong type of chancellor. it's the wrong type of chancellor in the wrong type of government with the wrong priorities for britain. mr. deputy speaker, mr. deputy speaker -- >> courtesy should be shown but can i say to everybody, the public also wants to hear what the opposition has got to say. if the cabinet members do not want to listen, then please leave the chair. some people may agree, some may disagree. the opposition
terrorist attacks on the united states all done by people other than afghans. outraged at continuing u.s. military occupation of predominantly muslim countries. that's not to justify what they do, but it is to clarify the condition that we have in afghanistan. for how long are we going to continue to dedicate hundreds of billions of dollars and thousands of lives before we realize we can't win afghanistan militarily? at the end of the year, the administration and u.s. military leaders were touting peace talks to end the war with high level taliban leaders. these leaders turned out to be fake. a november, 2010 article in "the new york times" detailed joint u.s. an afghan negotiations with a man the u.s. claim was one of the most senior commanders in the taliban. according to "the new york times" the episode underscores the uncertain and even bizarre nature of the atmosphere in which afghan and american leaders search for ways to bring the war to an end. leaders of the taliban are believed to be hiding in pakistan, possibly with the assistance of the pakistani government, which receives bi
, and i think a certain amount of confusion about what the potential danger is to the u.s. from the nuclear plant problems in japan, and particularly as the media's been following the last few days and a sense that the possibility of a meltdown at the plant, the explosion, and emission of a large amount of radioactivity and people are concerned about the west coast of the u.s., particularly hawaii, guam, and other islands may be subject to some danger, and i wonder if you have a current sense of what that possibility is? >> i'll refer back to the statement made by the chairman of nuclear regulatory commission in looking at all the scenarios, they do not see radiation reaching the u.s. that it would be of a danger or require protective angsts, but anticipation of this, fema support with the department of energy have a system called rad net. it's been there and 24 hours a day, seven days a week monitors various channels, air, water, other types of things across the country, and so if we were to detect anything, we may detect things well below any levels that require action. we did
. in about 40 minutes, u.s. ambassador to the u.n., susan rice, speaks with reporters at the white house. and in about an hour, british prime minister david cameron on why his government's actions on libya. on "washington journal," we will talk about federal spending with democratic representative marcia fudge of ohio, and republican senator mark kirk of illinois. and then we will speak with an ambassador. "washington journal" is live every day at 7:00 a.m. eastern. >> you are watching c-span bringing politics and public affairs. >> you are watching c-span, bringing you politics and public affairs. every morning it is "washington journal," our live call-in program about the news of the day, connecting you with elected officials, policymakers, and journalists. weekdays, watch live coverage of the u.s. house, and on weeknights, congressional hearings and policy forums. also supreme court oral arguments. on the weekends, you can see our signature interview programs. on saturdays, "the communicators," and on sundays, "newsmakers," "q&a," and prime minister's questions from the british house
at no expense to the u.s. taxpayer. this bill, which passed the house by voice vote last congress, commemorates the creation of a unique form of service that creates peace through people-to-people diplomacy. it doesn't cost the taxpayers a single pennyism urge my congressional colleagues to honor america's commitment to peace by having swift passage of this timely legislation. today as we mark this significant milestone in america's history, i urge each of you to join me in honoring your constituents who have served in and are supporting the peace corps funding so that we can usher in the next generation of americans who want to serve this country. i yield back the remainder of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes the gentleman from pennsylvania, mr. murphy. mr. murphy: mr. speaker, currently u.s. families spend about $1 billion per day on imported oil. we import about 1.6 billion barrels from politically unstable nations with corresponding instability in prices. which influence our dollars, our economy, and sometimes our soldiers having to look at defending these areas. now,
, commander, u.s. forces afghanistan, stated, quote, i can understand the frustration. we have been at this for 10 years. we have spent an enormous amount of energy and money. we have sustained very tough losses and difficult, life-changing wounds. but i think it is important to remember why we are there, end quote. this is about our vital national security interests, mr. speaker. it is about doing what is necessary to ensure that al qaeda and other extremists cannot re-establish safe havens such as the ones they had in afghanistan when the 9/11 attacks were planned against our nation and our people. the enemy indeed is on the run. it is demoralized and divided. let us not give up now. let us not betray the sacrifices of our men and women serving in harm's way and they ask for nothing in return except our full support. dedicated servants such as my stepton and daughter-in-law lindsay, who served in iraq, and lindsay also served in afghanistan, dedicated servants such as matt and greg of our foreign affairs committee the majority staff who just returned from serving a year and we tha
concludes this article with the statement that the u.s. does not have an energy problem, it has an energy strategy problem. think about that. it's not lacking the resources. it's the strategy for how we develop our energy resources. during his campaign, president obama liked to quote dr. martin luther king, and he talked about the fierce urgency of now. and there are few issues more important or more fundamental to our nation's long-term success than a viable energy policy. people are very correct when they say that parts of this will -- will take time. parts of it will take a longer period of time, but now is nevermore fiercely urgent than when we have such an important and such a long journey ahead of us. if we're ever going to take control of our energy future, now is the time to get -- to come together, support the policies that promote abundant, affordable, clean, diverse and domestic energy. critically important to us, madam president, and i look forward to these conversations that will continue on the floor as we talk about ways that we not only work to reduce our budget, ways that
that they comply with the u.s. -- with the security council mandate. >> so are you just watching them as proof -- are you watching them? >> we are conducting a wide range of operations across libya. i will not talk about the specifics. certainly the 32nd brigade is always considered in the calculation on how we expand the no-fly zone and how we conduct operations in the future. >> can you give us your assessment as of now of the libyan air forces? how many fixed wing and helicopters have you destroyed and will you try to destroy as much capability as possible before you get to the point where you can get the no-fly zone where you want it? >> well, when we began this, my estimation is that his air force is not generally in good repair compared to what you would consider most world standards for air forces. he had a lot of equipment that was old, much of it was sitting parked in the runways and it could not be used. he was effectively employing a tactical air force, a helicopter air force i would say on the order of several dozen rather than large numbers. when we began the coalition strikes, on
they are expanding output -- china has become a large export market for u.s. markets so that is not all in the negative. i would emphasize a long run energy policy so that we're not having this conversation every summer. we know that in the summer the demand -- that in the summer, demand goes up. we are having the same conversation again and again, year after year. whether energy efficiency, domestic production, or other energy policies to alternative fuels, it is important that we think those three. price of fuel is one risk. financial problems in europe remain a concern. a year ago, it felt we were getting momentum. the events in greece and some of these spooked financial markets, much like it does, so we continue to monitor the events in europe. third, the housing market remains in the dumps. there are maybe 5 million vacant homes, so i think it seems unlikely that with the reserve army of unemployed homes that it will become rebounding rapidly in the near future. that said, the impact of the housing sector on gdp growth, a major negative drag in 2008 and 2009, its impact on gdp grow
stopped buying our debt? what happens to interest rates? what happens to the u.s. economy? in the markets will absolutely devastate us if we do not step up to this problem. the problem is real, the solutions are painful, and we have to act. >> alan, do you want to add to that? >> i would just a -- i know it is repetitive, if you can understand hear what the people of america as we travel around and we do stuff. we go to the business council, we go to the conservative group in dallas, the economic club of new york, and wherever we go, people get it. then we tell them that if they just go to the internet and to go www.fiscalcommision.gov, it is 67 pages. if we leave that out they will never read it. it was not written for patents or politicians or panderers, it was written for the american people. it uses terms like "groing broke" and "shared sacrifice." there has never been any sacrifice required of the american people since world war ii except for our military, and god bless them, and they chose to do it. they are volunteers. so when somebody says, you cannot use that word. well, the amer
president william millar. frank gaffney talks about the u.s. response to the civil war in libya. and a look at the problem of bullying in schools with francisco negron of the national school board association. >> video this morning courtesy of al-jazeera. this is the nuclear reactor in japan. according to the associated press, an explosion there destroyed a building housing the reactor. and also there are fears that it could melt down after being hit by the earthquake and tsunami there in japan. again, those reports saying that large amounts of radiation were coming out in the evacuation around the plant expanded. but officials didn't know how dangerous at this time the leak was to people. again that courtesy there from al-jazeera this morning of the plant. now, in related use, there are also reports this morning as far as those who are affected, 1,300 dead, 2,000 people in emergency shelters. as you see there, people waiting on top of buildings to be rescued by various means this morning. this courtesy of n.h.k. and also there and 50,000 emergency crews. we registered in findin
to the u.s. government $125 billion in the last two years of profits. of course i want to emphasize that was not the purpose of the interventions. >> we'll not do it again. >> we are not doing it again. but we have i think managed at least well enough that the taxpayer can feel that they have gotten at least in this respect they have gotten their money back. >> thank you. ranking member. mr. paul. chairman of the monetary policy subcommittee. >> thank you, mr. chairman. let me just say a word about the deficit. the spending and deficit was a concern of mine in the early 1970's because i foresaw that after the breakdown of the branton woods we would have endless spending, deficits, financial bubbles and we have had that. as to whether or not we have military cane seism -- keynesianism, we do. i reject that as well as domestic moln -- domestic monetary canes yism. -- keynesianism. congress is at fault. they spend too much money. congress at times will say the fed's at fault. the congress and the fed are symbiotic, they have a symbiotic relationship because the congress spends and they
government forces and refbls on several fronts this morning. meanwhile, two u.s. warships entered the suez canal today, moving closer to the libyan coast. 400 marines are on board to help evacuate civilians, or provide humanitarian relief. cbs news correspondent mandy clark is with us with the very latest this morning. andy, good morning. >> good morning. i'm on the road to el breg which is a strategic town in eastern libya and also where pro-gadhafi forces are battling rebels in this oil stricken area. we're hearing that the rebels are managing to hold back the pro-gadhafi forces. we speak to one eyewitness on the phone, who described hearing jets overhead, and rockets going off. there's also a plume of smoke, which he says was part of an aerial bombardment. but it's unclear what was hit. now, we're currently in adjibaday and locals here say there's been an aerial campaign as well. they're saying a weapons depot has been hit but we can't independently verify that at the minute. >> mandy, el breg, you said you're on your way there. why is that area so important? >> well, el breg is particu
continue to escalate between government forces and rebels on several fronts this morning. two u.s. warships enter the u.s. canal this morning. 400 marines on board to help evacuate civilians or provide humanitarian relief. mandy clark is in ajdabiya with the latest for us this morning. man mandy, good morning. >> reporter: good morning. i'm on the road to al brega a town in eastern libya and where pro gadhafi forces are battling rebels in willing oil shipping area. now, we are hearing that the rebels are managing to hold back the pro-gadhafi forces. we spoke to one eyewitness on the phone who described hearing jets overhead and rockets going off. there is also a plume of smoke which he said was part of an aerial bombardment but it's unclear what was hit. now, we are currently in ajdabiya and locals say an aerial campaign as well. they are saying a weapons dough poe has been hit but we can't independently verify that at the minute. >> mandy, al brega, why is that area so important? you said you're on your way there. >> al brega is particularly important to gadhafi because it's an oil export
. nato officially took over command of all air operations over libya from the u.s. the labor department releases weekly figures today on unemployment benefits. that release comes ahead of the big monthly report on the jobs market. finally, a new study says the cost of health care for retirees has gone down. the steady says that a 65-year- old couple retiring this year will need about $230,000 to cover medical expenses. last year, they would've needed $250,000. fidelity expects the projection to resume its upward trend. those are some of the latest headlines on c-span radio. >> for more than four decades, the libyan people have been ruled by a tyrant, muammar gaddafi. he has denied his people's freedom, exploited their wealth, murdered opponents at home and abroad, and terrorized innocent people around the world. >> follow what leaders are saying about libya and how the process unfolded from the house and senate floor and from author leaders around the world, all online on the c-span video library. follow c-span on twitter. it is the fastest way to get updates as well as links to evens t
, your way. >> general david petraeus commands u.s. forces in afghanistan and will be on capitol hill tomorrow to give his assessment on the security situation in afghanistan. the u.s. is scheduled to begin withdrawing forces this summer from that country. live coverage from the senate armed services committee at 9:30 a.m. eastern on c-span3. later, the assistant secretary of the navy for energy and the environment will testify about u.s. military operations in the pacific, including japan. live coverage from the house armed services subcommittee on readiness starts at 2:00 p.m. eastern. now, discussion on u.s. public transportation policy. deputy transportation secretary discusses the obama administration's transportation budget priorities for next year. we'll also hear from an ohio congressman and an oregon congressman. the american public transportation association hosted this conference. >> good morning. you can do better than that. good morning. i think we are almost there. if you could take your seats, we would like to get this morning's opening session underway. good morning ag
say that anybody could come to the united states, all you have to do is sign up at the u.s. council in your u.s. embassy in your home country. and we'll send you, we'll give you a visa to come to the united states. we can say. that we could bring anybody in that wanted to come in. but why do we say no? because there's a limit. we have asked the question here in this congress and in previous congresses, asked and answered the question, first, how many are too many? and what kind of people do we want to encourage to come here and what kind of people do we want to discourage from coming here? these are the questions. we have all kinds of people involved in this debate that don't have the slightest idea how to begin to answer those questions. they just say, oh, my compassion compels me to be for open borders, my heart bleeds for people that aren't as fortunate as americans are so therefore i'm just going to be for turning a blind eye or granting amnesty so that i don't feel guilty that everybody can't live on the american dream like we all do. well, things have changed. things have chan
senator, dan coates diverred his first speech to the senate floor talking about the u.s. economy and budget cuts. this is 25 minutes. >> mr. president, returning to the senate is like in many ways having a chance to relive a part of your life, and yet doing so with a benefit of experience, the experience i gained in serving in this body before and also service from the private sector, and it allows you to see things differently than you saw them before, and while i've discussed with my colleagues what is the same here in the senate on return, there's also much that has changed in our country and that i think will mandate change in this institution. it's what has changed that has brought me back to the senate because the more that i witnessed what happens to our country, the more i realized, i, like many others across the country, need to reengage in the country and return to the time-tested principle, not to the least of which is returning our federal government to one that ensures a healthy, fiscal nation whose finances and policies promote job opportunities for its citizens. i
, mr. speaker, and my colleagues, that's not what american, good old u.s.a. medicine is all about. it's time, quality time spent with that doctor and maybe no prescriptions. and i yield back. ms. hayworth: it is precisely and thank you precisely the point that i'm agreeing on with you and we have all been driven to philosophically, we need to have solutions that empower our doctors, our patients and our providers to do all of them, to have the best and to do the best and consumer-based solutions are possible. our doctor's caucus is working hard on providing those ideas, real liability reform, which has to be part of this. we cannot possibly continue as we have been. that was a glarring omission from the a.c.a. but in addition, we need to recognize and appreciate and act upon the knowledge that our medical care can cost less. we do need to pay teaning to costs, but we need to pay attention to our doctors, providers, to use their best judgment, not empower something like the independent payment advisory board to make those decisions for us. that is a very dangerous thing and something t
floated by officials to make us screen all letters that are being sent by the u.s. postal service. something like that would drive up the cost of security immensely so that's a way that you can really mess with the system even without executing a successful attack. >> david ross, thanks so much for your insightful analysis. appreciate it. >> my pleasure. >> i hope you're wrong. meanwhile, gretchen, steve, what do you got? >> thank you very much for asking. >> the orca that killed a trainer is back in action. he was greeted with wild applause. is this really a bad idea? a man who trained those animals says that animal could kill again and will. he'll join us. >> president obama wants us to all go green. take a look at what happened in one state when they tried to do it. yes, those are 3 x 5 foot solar panels on the street. the story coming up next. [ male announcer ] at e-trade, investing means taking action with professional-grade research. and some of the most powerful, yet easy to use trading tools on the planet. it's investing with intelligence and cold hard conviction. e-trad
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)